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Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Infographic by Oxford Biosystems

Antimicrobial resistance is the ability of a microorganism (e.g., a bacterium, a virus, or a parasite) to resist the action of an antimicrobial agent resulting in a reduction or elimination of effectiveness of the antimicrobial agent to cure or prevent infection due to this microorganism.

Some bacteria are naturally resistant to certain antibiotics (intrinsic or inherent resistance). A more worrying problem is when some bacteria that are normally susceptible to antibiotics become resistant as a result of adaptation through genetic change (acquired resistance).

Multidrug resistance corresponds to resistance of a microorganism to multiple antimicrobials. The challenge with multidrug-resistant microorganisms lies in the limited number of remaining options (if any) for therapy of patients infected with these microorganisms.

Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide problem. Although some countries are reporting a decrease in prevalence of some resistant bacteria, antimicrobial resistance still is high or increasing in many countries, in particular for common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Additionally, cases of infections due to bacteria totally or almost totally resistant to antibiotics are currently emerging in the EU. Examples of such bacteria are carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae (often Klebsiella pneumoniae), and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter.

References
  1. ECDC information on Antimicrobial Resistance
  2. Antibiotic Guardian Campaign
  3. UK 5 year Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy 2013-2018
  4. ECDC database for Antimicrobial Resistance surveillance

Detection of Resistance Genes

Oxford Biosystems is able to supply a selection of products for the detection and identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in clinical samples.

AMR DIRECT FLOW CHIP PDF

The Master Diagnostica AMR (Antimicrobial Resistance) Direct Flow Chip is designed for screening multi-drug resistant bacteria in critically ill patients and enables the simultaneous detection of a panel of 20 antibiotic resistant genes directly from a variety of samples without prior DNA extraction or purification.

enables the simultaneous detection of a panel of 20 antibiotic resistant genes

The test is validated for use with rectal, perianal and perineal swabs, stool samples, nasal and pharyngeal aspirates, wound exudates, bacterial cultures on solid media and positive blood cultures. Targets include mecA, vanA, vanB, AmpCs, ESBLs and Carbapenemases.


SEPSIS FLOW CHIP PDF

The Master Diagnostica Sepsis Flow Chip enables the simultaneous detection of a panel of 40 pathogens responsible for sepsis, and 20 antibiotic resistance genes. The test is performed directly from blood cultures giving results within hours and providing essential information for clinicians to prescribe appropriate antibiotic therapy, reduce costs and improve patient care.

The test is performed directly from blood cultures giving results within hours

Targets include Gram positive cocci, Gram negative bacilli, Fungi, MRSA, mecA, vanA, vanB, ESBL, and Carbapenemases.


The AID Diagnostika Line Probe Assays are based on the reverse hybridisation of DNA and produce reliable and reproducible results. The tests are suitable for automated systems and the results are evaluated and documented with AID scanner and software.

Kits are available for:

Differentiation of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci
Detection of mecA and mecC
Detection of the most frequent resistance genes of staphylococci

Detection of the most important mutations in TEM and SHV
Detection of CTX-M and KPC (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenamase)
Validated for use with bacterial cultures and clinical samples

Detection of Mycobacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex
Detection of Isoniazid and Rifampicin resistance genes
Detection of Kanamycin, Amikacin and Capreomycin resistance genes
Detection of Fluoroquinolone and Ethambutol resistance genes
Validated for use with bacterial cultures and clinical samples

16S pan bacterial control included
Detection of 13 different carbapenamase resistance genes
Validated for use with bronchoelar lavage, sputum, wound swabs, bacterial cultures


Oxford Biosystems has pledged to be an Antibiotic Guardian

Oxford Biosystems

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Milton Park

Oxfordshire

OX14 4SA

Oxford Biosystems has pledged to be an Antibiotic Guardian

Members of:

BIVDA Member 2017